Resolution Adopted by the CCAR

HOUSING

Digests of resolutions adopted by the
Central Conference of American Rabbis
between 1889 and 1974

1. We urge that proper housing for working people be secured, if necessary, through government regulation. (1918, p. 102)

2. We urge that a great portion of the public reconstruction finance funds now being administered by our Government be given into the hands of publicly controlled groups for the building of decent housing facilities under municipal control. (1932, p. 102)

3. Housing for wage earners must be made a permanent Federal project through the establishment of a Federal Housing Division. (1935, p. 80)

4. We hope that the abolition of slums through Federal housing aids will be continued. (1942, p. 97)

5. We favor all methods of facilitating the building of modest-priced housing for veterans and members of the civilian population. (1946, p. 103)

6. We call attention to the grievous need for low-cost housing among people in low-income categories and by war veterans. We urge Congress to enact legislation for Federal subsidies to remedy this national disgrace. (1948, p. 128)

7. We endorse two measures before the 81st Congress: to establish a national housing objective and a policy to provide federal aid to assist slum clearance projects and low-rent public housing projects initiated by local agencies to provide for financial assistance for farm housing and other purposes. We also recommend that additional legislation be enacted to stimulate the building of rental housing for middle economic groups. (1949, p. 131)

8. Discrimination in Housing, See under Discrimination, d) Housing.

9. Reaffirming our belief in the principles of equality vital to American life, we believe all our cities and suburban areas should have open occupancy in housing. We consider it unfortunate that, in an era when Federal Civil Rights legislation is being used to bolster many of the rights of minority groups, we have nothing other than Executive Order 11063 and Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 in support of the right to equal housing opportunity. These are limited to Federally assisted housing, estimated to be less than twenty percent of current housing production. We recognize the urgent need for immediate remedial action. Inspired by the vision of the Psalmist who declared, "Behold how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity," we

therefore:

  1. Pledge ourselves to cooperate wherever possible with the local resources in our community seeking equal opportunity in housing for all.

  2. Urge the members of our congregations connected with the housing industry whether as lenders, realtors, landlords, or builders, as well as all who own homes, to support a policy of open occupancy.

  3. Call upon the President of the United States to extend Executive Order 11063 so that it will cover all housing which is financed by lending institutions supervised by the Federal government, thus increasing the Federal government's protection of the right to equal opportunity in housing to some eighty per cent of American homes, and that a copy of this resolution be forwarded to the President, the Vice President, and to the representatives of the news media. (1965, p. 120)